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Abraham Lincoln's 

Health 



Physicians 



Excerpts from newspapers and other 

sources 



From the files of the 
Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection 



'il.ZDO^.O^-Ol^OH 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Friends of The Lincoln Collection of Indiana, Inc. 



http://archive.org/details/abrahamlincolnshphylinc 



/43S 




Lincoln and the Doctors 



MILTON H. SHUTES 



si New Contribution to the 
Life of Lincoln 

A BOOK of an unusual and attractive sort is "Lincoln and 
the Doctors," by Dr. Milton H. Shutes, of Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, long a painstaking and reverent student of the career of 
the great War President. 

Gathering his material from widely scattered sources and 
carefully in each instance confirming its authenticity, Dr. 
Shutes' delightfully told story of Lincoln's contacts with the 
medical profession from his early New Salem days until his 
death, was first given serial publication in Hygeia, and there 
won instant acceptance as a substantial contribution to Lincoln 
literature. 

The publication of "Lincoln and the Doctors" in revised and 
expanded form will appeal alike to collectors and lovers of 
beautiful books. It is appropriately illustrated with full page 
reproductions of portraits of physicians who had intimate asso- 
ciation with Lincoln and of the arresting photograph of him 
taken a few days before his death. The opposite page shows the 
type and format selected for it. The book is bound in cloth of 
an attractive and durable sort and printed on paper expressly 
manufactured for the purpose. The edition is limited to 550 
numbered and autographed copies, of which 500 are offered 
for sale. 

An Appreciation 

I have read the manuscript of "Lincoln and the 
Doctors" with great interest and admiration. I think it 
is splendid. It is continuously interesting and contains 
many surprises. 

The pituitary peculiarities of Lincoln are of special 
interest to the medical profession; also the deviation of 
his left eye upwards is well shown in one of the fine illus- 
trations. The details of the great tragedy and of the 
subsequent post mortem are graphic and instructive. 
The author has the great gift of narrative. 

William Pallister, M.D. 

{Author of Poems of Science) 



CHAPTER TWO 

ON the high banks of the Sangamon River 
there was perched the young town of New 
Salem, an ambitious but short-lived venture of the 
Reverend John Cameron and his uncle, James Rut- 
ledge. Here came, about August 1, 1831, the stal- 
wart, resourceful young Lincoln, an Ichabod in 
appearance; sad of eye but with a wonderful smile, 
poor in pocket and raiment but rich in personality 
and character. He came armed with a contract to 
build and manage a store for one Denton Offut, 
who already had sent him on the famous flatboat 
trip to New Orleans. 

The stock in trade for the new store was sched- 
uled to arrive in Beardstown, where the Sangamon 
empties its waters into the Illinois River, and Abe 
Lincoln was "fixing to go fetch" it overland to New 
Salem. Now there lived near the town along the 
river a Dr. Nelson, who felt himself being crowded 
by too many neighbors, it was said, and who was 
hankering for Texas where the spaces were still 
wider and more open. So he arranged with our 
experienced flatboatman to help him raft his 
household goods down the river to Beardstown, 
where he boarded a river steamer for the South. It 
was no doubt a busy trip and gave Lincoln little 

[9] 



SPECIMEN PAGE 



Milton H. Shutes 

author of "Lincoln and the Doctors" 

Dr. Milton H. Shutes is a widely known and successful 
ophthalmo-otolaryngologist of Oakland, California. He was 
born in St. Louis in 1883, graduated from Central Wesleyan 
College in 1904, and received his medical degree from North- 
western in 1908. He spent two years in the Philippine Islands 
and Europe, and in 1911 and 1912 he was interne in and assis- 
tant surgeon to the Illinois Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary 
at Chicago. For the past twenty years he has been connected 
with the University of California at Berkeley, and is now chief 
of staff to two hospitals. 

The parents of Dr. Shutes lived many years in Springfield, 
Illinois, and his college vacations were all spent in the home 
town of Lincoln. For the past ten years he has been an absorbed 
student of Lincoln, and now possesses the best Lincoln library 
in Northern California. He is a member of the Illinois His- 
torical Society and of The Abraham Lincoln Association of 
Springfield. 



LINCOLNIANA PUBLISHERS 

Box Number 1110 
Fort Wayne, Indiana 

Please send me cop .... of 

LINCOLN AND THE DOCTORS 

by Milton H. Shutes 

$5.00 

N ame 

Address 

Check enclosed [ Charge my account [ | 



LINCOLN 

and the DOCTORS 



A Medical Narrative 

of the 

LIFE of ABRAHAM LINCOLN 



Ne 



By 
Milton H. Shutes, m.d. 



The Pioneer Press : New York 
April 15, 1933 



A New Contribution to the 

Life of Lincoln 

THE PIONEER PRESS of New York is pleased to announce 
that it has in preparation for publication on April 15 a book of 
an unusual and most attractive sort. It is entitled Lincoln 
and the Doctors, and its author is Dr. Milton H. Shutes of 
Oakland, California, long a painstaking and reverent student 
of the career of the great War President. 

Gathering his material from widely scattered sources and 
carefully in each instance confirming its authenticity, 
Dr. Shute's delightfully told story of Lincoln's contacts with 
the medical profession from his early New Salem days until 
his death was first given serial publication in Hygeia, and 
there won instant and wide acceptance as a welcome and 
substantial contribution to Lincoln literature. 

The present publication of Lincoln and the Doctors in 
revised and expanded form will appeal alike to Lincoln col- 
lectors and to lovers of beautiful books. It will be appropri- 
ately illustrated with six full page reproductions of portraits 
of physicians who had intimate association with Lincoln, 
and of an arresting photograph of him taken a few days 
before his death. The opposite page shows the type and 
format that have been selected for it. The book will be 
bound in cloth of an attractive and durable sort and will be 
printed on paper expressly manufactured for the purpose. 

The edition will be limited to five hundred and fifty num- 
bered copies of which five hundred will be offered for sale at 
$5.00 a copy. Subscriptions will be filled in the order received. 

For further particulars address: 

The Pioneer Press 

1 107 Broadway 

New York 



CHAPTER ONE 
N£ 

npHE ANCESTRAL HISTORY of Abraham 
■*- Lincolnreveals nothing that might cause the 
medical director of a life insurance company to 
hesitate in granting a policy to America's greatest 
son. His virile paternal grandfather, Captain 
Abraham Lincoln, was killed in the forty-second 
year of his life by the bullet of an Indian, and left 
five children and 1,200 acres of land. 

Bathsheba Lincoln, the widow, well born and 
strong of body and intellect, lived a pioneer's life 
and died at the reputed age of 100 years. As there 
is no knowledge of Lincoln's maternal grandfather, 
except that he was well born, the medical investi- 
gator would find nothing of interest there. But 
Lucy Hanks Sparrow, his maternal grandmother, 
led a useful life until about the age of 61, leaving 
eight children and many grandchildren to honor 
her. 

Thomas Lincoln, the father, survived the hard- 
ships of his life in Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana 
and Illinois, where he died in his seventy-fifth 
year; but his mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln, suc- 
cumbed when 37 years old to an epidemic disease 
possessing a high mortality. 

From a medical point of view the idea of family 
environment and of immediate forebears known 
as "poor but honest" is not a bad beginning for 
any biography. Thomas Lincoln was honest and 

[10] 



SPECIMEN PAGE 



An Appreciation 

THAVE read the manuscript of "Lincoln and 
-*■ the Doctors" with great interest and admira- 
tion. I think it is splendid. It is continuously in- 
teresting and contains many surprises. 

The pituitary peculiarities of Lincoln are of 
special interest to the medical profession; also 
the deviation of his left eye upwards is well shown 
in one of the fine illustrations. The details of the 
great tragedy and of the subsequent post mortem 
are graphic and instructive. The author has the 
great gift of narrative. 

William Pallister, M.D. 
{Author of Poems of Science) 



Shutee, Milton H. 

LINCOLN AND THE DOCTORS 

The Pioneer Press : New York 
April 15, 1933 

A valuable narrative history of the doctors with whom Lincoln 
had contact including the medical records of the entire fam- 
ily. There is some new and suggestive material, which would be 
immeasurably more valuable if adequately documented. The 
Appendices contain fourteen pages of significant letters. 



Notes on LINCOLN AND THE DOCTORS by Milton H. Shutes, M.D. 
( References at left are to page and line. ) 

3-27 Not three- in his third year. 
28 Not 12 miles, I think. 

4-1 Not eight- about seven ysars and eight months. 

5-19 Did not split rails-pulled fodder. 

7-26 I think Polly was not then married. 

8-6 L. split comparatively few rails. 

10-6 Confused , I think, with the raft built earlier for the 

Miss, trip. 

14-7 Is not L. usually represented as lending the horse. 

14-24 (too contact Mr. Lincoln) 

13-13 to IS Gives wrong idea of Lincoln 

18-13 The cabin disappeared long ago. 

31-27 Not a true picture 

13-9 Dr. Duncan Introduced L. to "Oh why should the..." 

17-7 Ann died of typhoid 

19-23 Source? 

31-21 Van Buren ! s coment on the night with Lincoln. 

33-6 How about Eddie's death? Cf . p55 
36 25-38 Too much emphasis on Lincoln's sorrow as compared with 

that of Mr 8. Lincoln. 
45 19-27 Source? 
50 7-10 Source? 

52 22-26 Source? 

53 24-28 " 

59 -20 Loaned for lent. 

61 2-5 Rung sweat. Source? 

70-16 Lincoln on Flowers 

74-24 Source? 



3 

77-19 into in one word for in to. 

43-33 Why Tbaddeus? 

45-21 L. used Jayne's Carminative. 

58-9 The Lincoln's used two bottles of brandy in ten 
days, possibly for a rum sweat. 

59 Whisky, perhaps caused the death of Sara and her 

child. Source? 

80 1-4 Source? Period missing line four. 

80-19 non-medical, not nonmedical 

81-16 Broncho-pneumonia, not bronchopneumonia 

82-3 Period below line 

82-4 to 9 Awkward sentence 

83 12-18 How does Dr. Shutes know this? 

88 

89 Chloroform story Source for this is absolutely essential. 

97-21 A strange figure if you think about it. 

98-1S n en echelon" 

101-17 Bowling Source? 

101-24 Distance to Soldiers 'Home 

85 Varioleloid after Gettysburg speech. 

93 14-17 I had some desire to t etain the paper (Gettysbnr g 
Speech) Source? 

97 5-8 Mr 8. Lincoln returned to Washington on Thursday 

evening, apparently much improved by her visit Nrth. 

The sick and wounded soldiers in our hospitals 
will hail her return with joy. Daily Morning 
Chronicle of November 29,1863 

103-20 sclerosing. Is there any such word. 

102-28 Source? Not true I think. 

103-7 astohined for astonished 



106 Was it a Mini* ball, and where did this story come from? 
111-12 Why "regicide" 

106 Source? 

108-1 Life mask by Clark Mills in spring 1865 
109-4 and then fainted. Source? 

109-25 Meeting of Lincoln, Grant, Sherman and Porter 
125-29 Should roman be Roman? 
126-1 Edwards* 

113-6 Lincoln taken to the room of William Clara. 

121 Mary at turn of life during '31 to »65 
126-18 Why immortal in de^th? 
127-24 Immortal 



- 




On Presidential Toes ■ 

^T^oday 1* the birthday of Abra- 
( ham Lincoln, and Dr. Gerald 
X M. Robin, a podiatrist in the 
Washington area, has come up with a 
historical note an the Lincoln Presi- 
dency that is of obvious pride to his 

President Lincoln, according to Dr. 
i's research, engaged Dr. isa- 






char Zacharie to treat his foot prob- 
lems and then was so impressed with 
the podiatrist that he came to rely on 
him as an unofficial White House ad- 



Dr. Robinsaid a New York newspa- 
per editorial in 1864 reported that the 
podiatrist "enjoyed Mr. Lincoln's 
confidence perhaps more than any 
other private individual." Among his 
other assignments, Dr. Zacharie was 
sent to Richmond as the President's 
emissary to confer with members of 
the Confederate Cabinet. 

"Dr. Zacharie apparently was not 
too successful as a political emissary 
of the President, but he performed 
wonders in caring for the foot prob- 
lems of Mr. Lincoln and other high 
Government and military officials of 
the time," said Dr. Robin, who hired 
a public relations concern to put out 
the news. 



SOLNREMEBY iV 

w jS 6 ■ ■ ** 



rug: Stora Ledger Of 1350-54 
— N Sliows Purchases Made By 
$ Martyr President. 

Abrah.im Lincoln used four gallons 
of paregoric in his home during the 
yr.ir 1051. mid only seven quarts of 
brandy over the same period. 

This, and other Interesting Informa- 
tion, is contained in tiie Hoy &- Jamcn 
dice stoia ledger. 

The Hoy <fc James drug store oper- 
ated In Springfield, "111 " .when Lincoln 
resided there. The- building no longer 
stands, but the account book is well 
preserved and bears the ftcovded needs 
■of 250 families, Inclifdingthe family of 
Mr. Abraham Lincoln.;-.-- 

Drug stores durlng";thc" Lincoln era 
adhered strictly to drugs and pow- 
der?. Merchandise did not range from 
Isilet Roods to hardware fixtures. 

Castile soap was the common, "clean- 
ser; cologne, the perfume; rice pow- 
der, the cosmetic; ■ and licorice", the 
popular confection. Purchases were 
.lot skimpy. Ink was purchased By the 
lialf gallon; castor oil by the gallon. 
1' ie finest whiskies sold for ,35 'cents 
i quart, while gasoline retailed, at 30 
:i lit.": a gallon. Restoratives Tor falnt-.i 
I and cures for spasms were go -> d sellers. 
1 Had Tounjr Children. 

Mr. Lincoln's account In tho Wger 

ran from 1850 to 11151, during tho years 

(hat lie was a young married man with 

J, a family. This accounts for his lar^o 

J A /i^'l purchases of paregoric. The Lincoln 

£r- (£> fr-mily also used quantities of cream of 

£ JPf^" tarter (used to euro hives), ginger, 

y> ^/v7 I, ay rum, cpecac, sarsaparllla, and pain 

SYvV e:: tractor. 

The rJrlces, iraced in- faded -Ink on 
■ tho ledger, seem paltry compared to 
LI. .2 present scale of living. One of 
Lincoln's orders, castor oil, coffee, and 
sap pills, totaled 35 cents. Another 
order , Indicates that tho combined, 
.price- of a. hair brush, tooth brush, 
and a bottle of beef marrow extract 

• totaled 40 cents. 

The account of one Reuben Coon 
shows the following purchases:, "our 
gallons of castor oil; 10 bottles of ex- 
pectorant, at $t' per. bottle; 15 boxes 
,of Gco'lch; snuff,' eight .brixes of Iiorso 
powder; and numerous \purcliascs of 

• gum arabic/ ' 





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